St Dennis & Nanpean

04.09.2018

St Dennis & Nanpean

Just a few miles from St Austell town, St Dennis and Nanpean are villages that have grown over many years.

From just a few settlements both have become an area with an ever-growing population with growing families and generations of locals alike.

The area is not short of history and heritage with place and road names that featured in the Domesday Book still in existence. One thing to look out for, stop and appreciate is St Denys Parish Church, which can be found at the top of Carne Hill, on the site of an Iron Age hill fort. It is believed the name ‘Denys’ stems from the word ‘Dinas’ which is Cornish for hill fort.

The China Clay industry has played a massive part of the villages’ industry and by the mid-20th Century, it provided employment for many of those living in the areas.

Today the communities in both St Dennis and Nanpean remain thriving, with, between them, a village band, football clubs, schools, WI, Old Cornwall Society, carnival events, among many others.

There are plenty of community events happening throughout the year – do you run one of these? Tell us about them – as well as more about life in St Dennis and Nanpean – and we’ll add them to the site. Simply email [email protected] with the details.

The Goss Moor trail

04.09.2018

The Goss Moor trail

Just a stones throw from Roche, St Dennis and Nanpean is the fantastic Goss Moor trail. Covering seven miles, this circular trail takes you around the rugged expanse of Goss Moor.

The majority of the route is off-road and relatively flat, making it a great route for families with children to enjoy.

Although perfect for cycling, it is a multi-use trail, so you may also see some walkers, runners and horse riders making use of the route.

Goss Moor is a National Nature Reserve and its rich diversity means that the area is home to breeding birds including Reed Bunting, Linnet, Grasshopper Warbler, Bullfinch and Song Thrush. Interestingly, it is also one of the main breeding areas in England for the rare Marsh Fritillary Butterfly. Legend even has it that the area was the hunting ground of King Arthur.

The site is managed by Natural England, so users are asked to help look after the reserve by following the Countryside Code and keep dogs under control. Make sure you stick to the marked paths as there are dangerous pools and bogs around the trail.

There are various small car parks along the route, as stated on the map below and toilets and shops can be found in neighbouring villages.


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